The Grasshopper – The Latest Snow Forecast

The Grasshopper – The Latest Snow Forecast

North American Forecast – Plenty going on with plenty for everyone

 

Wednesday 16th of January (Pacific time)

 

Snowfalls are more evenly spread in this week’s ten-day snow accumulation chart with plenty for everyone. Source:: windy.com

 

It’s a fairly stormy week ahead with lots going on; some days almost turned into an essay. Again, the Sierras stick out with ten-day accumulations up over the metre mark, but about half of that will fall in the next 24 hours during the current storm. The Rockies are also looking good with accumulations getting up around 50cm-75cm in a lot of places with fairly consistent falls on the cards. The Coast Mountains and Cascades will have a large chunk of their accumulations come down over the next few days, but there should be enough thereafter to keep the slopes fresh and fruity.

 

Thursday 17 Jan:

A low, sitting just off the west coast, trundles northwards without making landfall. However, it pushes in moisture laden S-SW winds over the Sierras, Cascades and the Coast Mountains of Canada. It’ll be a full on blizzard in the Sierras with heavy falls, but it will ease in the evening as it gets heavier over the Coast Mountains. There’ll be good snowfalls over the Canadian Rockies and those of Montana and Idaho where the moisture meets much colder air. A low also flares up over the High Plains, ensuring decent snowfalls spread east over Utah, Wyoming and Colorado.

 

Friday 18 Jan:

Snow falling throughout the length of the Rockies will gradually ease as the low over the High Plains meanders eastwards. Snowfalls over the Coast Mountains will ease, but return again late in the day with renewed vigor as a second low in the Pacific follows a similar path to the previous one, while also ravaging the Cascades. The Sierras will see snow showers, mostly in the morning and evening.

 

Saturday 19 Jan:

As the second low in the Pacific makes it’s way towards the Gulf of Alaska, moisture laden S-SW winds drop moderate to heavy snowfalls over the Cascades, the mountains of Idaho and Montana, as well as over Canadian resorts where it’ll ease later in the day. High pressure further south over the Rockies will restrict things to just flurries late in the day.

 

Sunday 20 Jan:

A westerly airstream coming off the Pacific will bring more snow to the Cascades, the northern Sierras and the Rockies of Idaho and Montana. Snowfalls will then spread over the southern Sierras and southern placed Canadian resorts during the latter half of the day as a deepening low makes its way inland.

 

Monday 21 Jan:

The low will slowly drift over the High Plains, drawing in chilly northerlies and decent snowfalls across the American Rockies. Remaining snowfalls along the Pacific Crest will dwindle, and a front will get snowfalls going over the Coast Mountains of Canada later.

 

Tuesday 22 Jan:

Another westerly airstream will bring moderate snowfalls to Canadian resorts, while high pressure further south clears any remaining snowfalls over the American Rockies.

 

Wednesday 23 Jan:

A cold northerly airstream should spread light to moderate snowfalls from the Canadian Rockies down to at least Wyoming and possibly Colorado.

 

Extended Outlook:

Next Thursday and Friday should see high pressure build over western North America, reducing snowfalls to just flurries here and there over the Rockies. It’s very much up in the air what will happen after that, but the high pressure looks like a big, slow moving oaf, so we may have to wait until after next weekend before things get going again.

Friday 28 September

 

Synoptic Outlook:

Well guys and gals, the end is nigh. After this weekend, some resorts will close their doors on what has been an epic season. Other resorts will carry on the good fight until next weekend, the 7thof October. Today is my last forecast of the season… sob… then I will be heading into the backcountry to eke out some last turns before hanging up my six ski boots for good… or at least until the northern hemisphere starts dumping snow.

 

Warm northwesterlies are currently blowing over the Aussie Alps ahead of a cold front, which will slowly inch its way over us tonight, bringing snow showers and cold southerly winds. Snow accumulations will only be in the order of 2-5cm, which isn’t much but will provide nice surface conditions for one last hoorah of the season. The sun will come out later on Saturday as high pressure builds and will see us through Sunday and Monday.

 

Image Of The Day:

 

Not too bad a day up the hill today. A wee bit of snow will fall tonight into early Saturday morning, making surface conditions mint for the lucky last weekend at some resorts. Source:: Metservice (vandilised by the Grasshopper)

 

Friday 28 September:

A fine start, but cloud will build will build from afternoon as strong to gale NW winds ease. Snow showers will come in from the south tonight and overnight.

 

Saturday 29 September:

Snow showers will clear by midday, then the sun will come out to play. Freezing southerly winds gradually easing.

 

Sunday 30 September:

Sun and fun for your Sunday, with a chilly start and light winds.

 

Monday 1 October:

Slip slop slap and shred. Temps will swelter as the sun blazes with hardly a breath of wind.

 

Extended Outlook:

Northerly winds will kick in on Tuesday, bringing in a little cloud, then it’ll swing to the NW and strengthen on Wednesday with a spot of wet stuff falling on us. The wet stuff will really come down on Thursday as a front hits with temps too warm for snow. However, we might get a wee dusting early next Friday as colder air reaches us. We should have settled weather next weekend as a ridge digs in to the south.

 

That’s all from the Grasshopper for this season. I’ll see you all again once the northern hemisphere kicks off. If you have a question or feedback for me, hit me up on facebook.

Friday 28 September

 

Synoptic Outlook:

Well guys and gals, the end is nigh. Within a couple of weeks resorts will close their doors on what has been an epic season. Today’s forecast will be my last for the season… sob… but as you will see, a tonne of snow is yet to fall on Aotearoa, which will see the season go out with a bang! After that, I will head into the backcountry to eke out some last turns before hanging up my six ski boots for good… well, at least until the northern hemisphere starts dumping snow.

 

It’s a chilly start to a mostly fine day thanks to the ridge that’s lounging over us. However, the atmosphere is a little unstable and will kick up some snow showers over Ruapehu this afternoon. The ridge will move off to the north on Saturday, clearing the way for an active cold front to slowly work its way up the South Island. This front will dump a serious amount of powder onto the Southern Lakes during Saturday, then Canterbury during Sunday as it spins up into a low. Accumulations will be in the realm of 20-30cm or more! The low will then drift up the west coast on Monday, while snow falls on Ruapehu and a weak ridge affects the South Island.

 

Image Of The Day:

 

 

A nice day to be on the slopes today, thanks to the sunny ridge. However, watch out for thunderstorms and snow showers on Ruapehu this afternoon. Epic amounts of snow will fall over the next week or so and will see the season go out with a bang! Source:: Metservice (vandilised by the Grasshopper)

 

Friday 28 September:

Mostly sunny for the South Island with a NW breeze picking up. A fine start on Ruapehu with a westerly breeze, but there’ll be a few afternoon snow showers with possible thunderstorms.

 

Saturday 29 September:

It’ll start snowing over the Southern Lakes from late morning and there’ll be heavy falls later in the day. High cloud will build in Canterbury, and we might see a snow flurry or two. NW winds will rise to gale over the South Island. For Ruapehu, there’ll be some afternoon cloud and a snow flurry or two as well as a westerly breeze.

 

Sunday 30 September:

Snow falling across the South Island, but it’ll gradually clear later in the day. N-NW winds will be blowing a gale in Canterbury. It’ll be rather cloud on Ruapehu with the odd snow shower from afternoon as NW winds strengthen.

 

Monday 1 October:

Mostly fine for the South Island with light winds. Snow on Ruapehu will ease around midday as gale NW winds ease, then it’ll return at night.

 

Extended Outlook:

The low will be weak as it crosses the North Island during Tuesday, but we’ll still have a hefty dump of fresh powder on Ruapehu in the order of 15-20cm. Also on Tuesday, yet another cold front will brush the South Island, giving us a nice wee dusting of freshies. NW winds will kick in on Wednesday and clear any muck away so we can shred all this new pow pow. Another frontal system should trundle up the country from late Thursday or next Friday, with snow possibly falling through next weekend, yikes!

 

That’s all from the Grasshopper. Wanna keep your finger on the pulse of all things snow? Join my weekly email list by filling in the box below. If you have a question or feedback for me, hit me up on facebook.

 

Japan Forecast – Goodness gracious me, snow for the next nine days

 

Thursday 17th January (Japan time)

 

Ten-day snow accumulations. Big snowfall totals with snow expected to fall for the next nine days. Source:: windy.com

 

After a settled sunny week, we are now back in business. It’s going to be a week of big snowfalls, especially on Honshu where a series of troughs each brings heavy falls. Between 1-1.5m or more should accumulate on the Hida and Echigo Mountains of central Honshu during the next ten days with a bit less elsewhere on Honshu and Hokkaido. Our high-resolution model is calling for 74cm for both Hakuba and Niseko for the next seven days. Despite big totals, consistency will be a major feature with snow forecast to fall every day for the next nine days. Goodness gracious me!

 

Thursday 17 Jan:

As promised, it’s snowing! It’s coming down heavier the further north we look where winds are coming from the west, while winds are from the SW on Honshu. Winds will gradually swing around to a strong-gale NW later today as temps plummet and snowfalls increase. Boom!

 

Friday 18 Jan:

Heavy snowfalls before dawn, then it’ll gradually back off through the day as strong NW winds start to abate. Wrap up warm; it’s going to be a super cold one.

 

Saturday 19 Jan:

Snow showers gradually petering out as NW winds continue to ease. Milder temps will creep over central and southern Honshu later in the day as winds swing around to the W-SW.

 

Sunday 20 Jan:

A trough deepens in the Sea of Japan then crosses Honshu during the day with heavy snowfalls. Temps will be relatively mild to start with, but they’ll plummet once winds turn to the NW late in the day. Snow showers will also get going on Hokkaido during the morning, and then gradually ramp up to consistent and heavier falls in the evening as W-NW winds hit.

 

Monday 21 Jan:

Snow will continue to bucket down, but will start to ease in the latter half of the day as strong-gale NW winds begin abating.

 

Tuesday 22 Jan:

A bit of inconsistency starting to creep in between different models, but we should see more snow with potentially heavy falls on Honshu as yet another trough is likely to cross Japan.

 

Wednesday 23 Jan:

Models agree that a low will deepen east of Japan, but they all plonk it in different positions. However, it’s unanimous that snow will continue to come down, with potentially more heavy falls on Honshu complete with freezing strong-gale NW winds there.

 

Extended Outlook:

The deep low should move further off to the E-NE of Japan while snow and freezing NW winds continue through next Thursday before easing later on Friday as a ridge or high builds. The next storm system looks to brew up next Saturday and should hit on Sunday. The crystal ball is a bit hazy regarding this system at the moment; it could be a big one, so check in next Thursday for all the dirty details.

North American Forecast – Plenty going on with plenty for everyone

 

Wednesday 16th of January (Pacific time)

 

Snowfalls are more evenly spread in this week’s ten-day snow accumulation chart with plenty for everyone. Source:: windy.com

 

It’s a fairly stormy week ahead with lots going on; some days almost turned into an essay. Again, the Sierras stick out with ten-day accumulations up over the metre mark, but about half of that will fall in the next 24 hours during the current storm. The Rockies are also looking good with accumulations getting up around 50cm-75cm in a lot of places with fairly consistent falls on the cards. The Coast Mountains and Cascades will have a large chunk of their accumulations come down over the next few days, but there should be enough thereafter to keep the slopes fresh and fruity.

 

Thursday 17 Jan:

A low, sitting just off the west coast, trundles northwards without making landfall. However, it pushes in moisture laden S-SW winds over the Sierras, Cascades and the Coast Mountains of Canada. It’ll be a full on blizzard in the Sierras with heavy falls, but it will ease in the evening as it gets heavier over the Coast Mountains. There’ll be good snowfalls over the Canadian Rockies and those of Montana and Idaho where the moisture meets much colder air. A low also flares up over the High Plains, ensuring decent snowfalls spread east over Utah, Wyoming and Colorado.

 

Friday 18 Jan:

Snow falling throughout the length of the Rockies will gradually ease as the low over the High Plains meanders eastwards. Snowfalls over the Coast Mountains will ease, but return again late in the day with renewed vigor as a second low in the Pacific follows a similar path to the previous one, while also ravaging the Cascades. The Sierras will see snow showers, mostly in the morning and evening.

 

Saturday 19 Jan:

As the second low in the Pacific makes it’s way towards the Gulf of Alaska, moisture laden S-SW winds drop moderate to heavy snowfalls over the Cascades, the mountains of Idaho and Montana, as well as over Canadian resorts where it’ll ease later in the day. High pressure further south over the Rockies will restrict things to just flurries late in the day.

 

Sunday 20 Jan:

A westerly airstream coming off the Pacific will bring more snow to the Cascades, the northern Sierras and the Rockies of Idaho and Montana. Snowfalls will then spread over the southern Sierras and southern placed Canadian resorts during the latter half of the day as a deepening low makes its way inland.

 

Monday 21 Jan:

The low will slowly drift over the High Plains, drawing in chilly northerlies and decent snowfalls across the American Rockies. Remaining snowfalls along the Pacific Crest will dwindle, and a front will get snowfalls going over the Coast Mountains of Canada later.

 

Tuesday 22 Jan:

Another westerly airstream will bring moderate snowfalls to Canadian resorts, while high pressure further south clears any remaining snowfalls over the American Rockies.

 

Wednesday 23 Jan:

A cold northerly airstream should spread light to moderate snowfalls from the Canadian Rockies down to at least Wyoming and possibly Colorado.

 

Extended Outlook:

Next Thursday and Friday should see high pressure build over western North America, reducing snowfalls to just flurries here and there over the Rockies. It’s very much up in the air what will happen after that, but the high pressure looks like a big, slow moving oaf, so we may have to wait until after next weekend before things get going again.

North American Forecast – Plenty going on with plenty for everyone

 

Wednesday 16th of January (Pacific time)

 

Snowfalls are more evenly spread in this week’s ten-day snow accumulation chart with plenty for everyone. Source:: windy.com

 

It’s a fairly stormy week ahead with lots going on; some days almost turned into an essay. Again, the Sierras stick out with ten-day accumulations up over the metre mark, but about half of that will fall in the next 24 hours during the current storm. The Rockies are also looking good with accumulations getting up around 50cm-75cm in a lot of places with fairly consistent falls on the cards. The Coast Mountains and Cascades will have a large chunk of their accumulations come down over the next few days, but there should be enough thereafter to keep the slopes fresh and fruity.

 

Thursday 17 Jan:

A low, sitting just off the west coast, trundles northwards without making landfall. However, it pushes in moisture laden S-SW winds over the Sierras, Cascades and the Coast Mountains of Canada. It’ll be a full on blizzard in the Sierras with heavy falls, but it will ease in the evening as it gets heavier over the Coast Mountains. There’ll be good snowfalls over the Canadian Rockies and those of Montana and Idaho where the moisture meets much colder air. A low also flares up over the High Plains, ensuring decent snowfalls spread east over Utah, Wyoming and Colorado.

 

Friday 18 Jan:

Snow falling throughout the length of the Rockies will gradually ease as the low over the High Plains meanders eastwards. Snowfalls over the Coast Mountains will ease, but return again late in the day with renewed vigor as a second low in the Pacific follows a similar path to the previous one, while also ravaging the Cascades. The Sierras will see snow showers, mostly in the morning and evening.

 

Saturday 19 Jan:

As the second low in the Pacific makes it’s way towards the Gulf of Alaska, moisture laden S-SW winds drop moderate to heavy snowfalls over the Cascades, the mountains of Idaho and Montana, as well as over Canadian resorts where it’ll ease later in the day. High pressure further south over the Rockies will restrict things to just flurries late in the day.

 

Sunday 20 Jan:

A westerly airstream coming off the Pacific will bring more snow to the Cascades, the northern Sierras and the Rockies of Idaho and Montana. Snowfalls will then spread over the southern Sierras and southern placed Canadian resorts during the latter half of the day as a deepening low makes its way inland.

 

Monday 21 Jan:

The low will slowly drift over the High Plains, drawing in chilly northerlies and decent snowfalls across the American Rockies. Remaining snowfalls along the Pacific Crest will dwindle, and a front will get snowfalls going over the Coast Mountains of Canada later.

 

Tuesday 22 Jan:

Another westerly airstream will bring moderate snowfalls to Canadian resorts, while high pressure further south clears any remaining snowfalls over the American Rockies.

 

Wednesday 23 Jan:

A cold northerly airstream should spread light to moderate snowfalls from the Canadian Rockies down to at least Wyoming and possibly Colorado.

 

Extended Outlook:

Next Thursday and Friday should see high pressure build over western North America, reducing snowfalls to just flurries here and there over the Rockies. It’s very much up in the air what will happen after that, but the high pressure looks like a big, slow moving oaf, so we may have to wait until after next weekend before things get going again.

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Who is The Grasshopper ?

Some say he hatched one summer on a Himalayan plateau. As cold Autumn winds set in, he stumbled upon a scrap of goretex shed by some unfortunate climber and turned it into the smallest snowsuit ever. Then he strapped himself into a nearby leaf and carved his way down the mountains, hitching a ride with some hikers back to civilisation.

Now Mountainwatch’s resident meteorology sensei, this season we can expect a lot from the little critter. His beloved monthly outlooks across Australia and New Zealand over the southern hemisphere winter are being replaced with outlooks for both Japan and North America over November and December leading into the northern hemisphere winter. From there, the little critter will go into overdrive producing weekly forecasts for Japan and North America from December through to March. No doubt he’ll be run off his feet, so it’s a good thing he has six.

Latest Outlooks

Who is The Grasshopper ?

Some say he hatched one summer on a Himalayan plateau. As cold Autumn winds set in, he stumbled upon a scrap of goretex shed by some unfortunate climber and turned it into the smallest snowsuit ever. Then he strapped himself into a nearby leaf and carved his way down the mountains, hitching a ride with some hikers back to civilisation.

Now Mountainwatch’s resident meteorology sensei, this season we can expect a lot from the little critter. His beloved monthly outlooks across Australia and New Zealand over the southern hemisphere winter are being replaced with outlooks for both Japan and North America over November and December leading into the northern hemisphere winter. From there, the little critter will go into overdrive producing weekly forecasts for Japan and North America from December through to March. No doubt he’ll be run off his feet, so it’s a good thing he has six.